New Year, New Patreon Tier

I have been cooking up a new tier to offer my patrons on Patreon. Members of The Charm Syndicate receive:

  • A guaranteed place in periodic, online writing workshops hosted by me
  • A podcast recording of my visits to Scottish Witches Monuments
  • Access to the entire archive of my writing on Scottish Witches Monuments
  • A monthly New Moon Tale read aloud with a downloadable PDF with custom collage artwork
  • 10% off at my webshop, http://www.feralstrumpet.com
  • Exclusive blog Updates
  • Updates about my writing life

 In other news, my short story “Selchie,” inspired by the grave of Lillias Adie and Scottish seal-wife stories, will be published in Fiddler’s Green’s first all fiction issue. Preorders are available here: https://www.fiddlersgreenzine.com/shop/tales-fiddlers-green-1 And the issue is due out in Spring.

I am planning to host a writing workshop via Zoom in March, following on the success of the Winter’s Last Ghost Missives Workshop. Watch this space!

Karen McCrindle Warren on her Highland Bagpipe Composition for the Accused


“The Burning of the Nine Women on the Sands of Dumfries, April 13th, 1659.
By J. Copland, Dundrennan

I spoke to Karen McCrindle Warren about her Piobaireachd, composed for the Highland Bagpipes.

You can hear Karen play her Piobaireachd  here.

The tune is one of memorial and witness for women executed in Dumfries in 1659, but also stands in as a memorial for all those executed for whom there is no physical memorial.  The tune was commissioned by Steve Rooklidge of the Shasta Piping Society of California. Asked for a remembrance piece for the “devastating witch trials that took place during the 16th and 17th centurires. A “Lament for the Accused”, if you will.” He included a link to the Interactive Witchcraft Map published by the University of Edinburgh. 

Questions in bold are mine. Here is what she told me: 

“This tune commemorates the events of 13th April 1659, when nine Galloway women were executed on Dumfries Whitesands.  Agnes Commes, Janet McGowane, Jean Tomson, Margaret Clerk, Janet McKendrig, Agnes Clerk, Janet Corsane, Helen Moorhead and Janet Callon, were “stranglit at stakes till they be dead, and thereafter their bodies to be burnt to ashes”.  This began a third peak in Galloway – more and more witch finders came forward, demanding their fees for rounding up suspects and torturing confessions from them.

“The tune is written in pentatonic G – the key that gives the most dissonance against the drones, symbolising the pain, fear and anxiety of these times, and the high G’s symbolising the screams of the ‘witches’ who were tortured for confession and put to such horrific public execution.  Not enough to kill them by strangling them at the stake, they had to be sure they were dead by also burning their bodies to ashes.”

Can you tell me more about how the Piobaireachd was commissioned? 

…I started looking through the map and searching for more information about witchcraft in Scotland, and particularly relating to Ayrshire, Dumfries and Galloway which is my area of interest.  I wrote music that was dark and desperate, but it took a while to find the story behind the title, and find the right title that suited the tune.  In the end, I felt the tune, title and story were a perfect fit.

Piobaireachd has a way of pulling at the heart strings, as the variations grow in intensity, it is like waves of grief coursing through the body and soul, returning to the calm of the ground as you try to compose yourself and move forward in life.

Karen McCrindle Warren

Your Piobaireachd is moving and intense, demanding time and space for witness. Traditionally, how has this style of composition been used in memorials?  

Piobaireachds have been used in memorials for centuries.  It is the traditional, ancient music of the bagpipe, and is often used to lament or salute those we have lost.  For example “Lament for Mary MacLeod”, “Lament for the Duke of Hamilton”, or “Lament for the Children” – this last one was written by Patrick Mor MacCrimmon who lost seven of his eight sons to small pox within a year.  This year the piping world lost a talented and lovely young man Alex Duncan at the age of 26.  A close family friend wrote a piobaireachd to commemorate him “Lament for Alex Duncan” and it was performed at the Glenfiddich Championship at Blair Castle where Alex used to spend a lot of time piping.  For one tune, our whole world came together and remembered this wonderful young man and mourned such a great loss to our community.  Piobaireachd has a way of pulling at the heart strings, as the variations grow in intensity, it is like waves of grief coursing through the body and soul, returning to the calm of the ground as you try to compose yourself and move forward in life.

What aspects of the history of the witch hunts informed your composition? 

I really didn’t know anything about witches in Scotland before Steve brought it up – we all learnt about Anne Boleyn having her head chopped off for being a witch, but I had never really considered witchcraft in Scotland.  What an eye opener that map was!  As I read into some of the cases, the things these poor people were being accused of was just crazy.  Anyone could fall out with you and accuse you of being a witch and your life would be over. Suspicion was enough to accuse, repute was enough to convict.  It must have been a terrifying time, and it was this state of distress I tried to bring out in the music. 

There is growing momentum for a national memorial to those killed during the witch hunts in Scotland. How do you see your composition playing a role in this work for a national monument? 

This isn’t something I’m familiar with but my music is freely available to anyone who wishes to listen, use it in memorials or learn to play it, and I hope it helps to evoke the desperation of the times and the memory of all these poor people who had their lives taken in such a cruel and violent way for nothing.

Karen can be found online at: 

www.elixir.scot

www.facebook.com/southwestscotlandcollection   

www.facebook.com/elixir.scot 

Ghost Missives Online Writing Workshop

As part of the Winter’s Last program, I will presenting poetry as well as teaching an online writing workshop on January 29th. 

Ghost Missives: A Writing Workshop Exploring Ancestors and Place

The nights are long and the veil is thin. We tell tales of the dead in verse and song and they tell of us in the wind, rain, ice, and stone.  

In this collaborative workshop, I will facilitate the writing of letters in prose poetry to and from the ancestors.  The writing will be rooted the Scottish landscape. To set the tone, the session will begin with readings specific to the liminal landscape, and move on to collaborative work.  I will guide the group as they work with prompts or “Wilding Cards” I will have made up.  These will be exchanged by the group. After some dealing and discussion we will get down to write using the prompts we all have. Writers will be invited to play with voice, speaking from the point of view of our ancestors, ourselves or the land itself. In the final section of the workshop there will be opportunity for further collaboration between writers as well as time to read and share with the group.

For more information on tickets and other presenters and workshops, go to the Tiabhsear Collective website

October’s New Moon Tale

Hello friends– this month’s new moon tale is inspired by a visit to Hoy I made many years ago to visit the 5,000 year old stone house/portal tomb called the Dwarvie Stane. On that visit, I happened upon the grave of Betty Corrigall. This was back before everything could be found on the internet, back before her grave had a brown tourist sign. The grave held a fascination to me–who was she? Now you can find online the answers to everything but this question. It was only recently I found that this grave has held an entirely different, ghoulish fascination for others. This tale is also inspired by an old fairy tale called the “Dwarvie Stane.” Become a subscriber to my Patreon to listen and read this tale now.

Presenting at the Winter’s Last Event in Edinburgh.


I’m honoured to be presenting my work at Winter’s Last: A Celebration of Scottish Folklore, Traditions and Community Practices hosted by The Taibhsear Collective, the last in their trilogy of explorations into Winter customs. The weekend will be held on the 23rd and 24th January 2021 at the Scottish Storytelling Centre Edinburgh. In the event of a possible lockdown, the readings, performances and workshops will be held online over the course of several weeks.

One Year on Patreon

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This week marks my first year anniversary on Patreon.  It’s been a year of community, witness and ancestral storytelling

– 23 quarter-moon updates
– 16 witches’ monuments
– 5 publications
– 3 New Moon tales—modern retellings based on Scottish folklore.
– 2 spoken word files

My new goal is to reach 75 patrons. This will help me to invest in a microphone for better quality sounds files when recording the spoken word pieces as well as when I’m reading the New Moon Tales. You can join my community here:

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